SHYLOCKING TENDENCIES ENSLAVING KENYANS!!!

INSTANT CASH ON HOUSEHOLD ITEMS!!! Is a sign that could replace the Nairobi City Council as the most seen sign in Nairobi? These shylock shops have mushroomed with a worrying tendency all over the country.
Their popularity is being fueled majorly by emergence expenditure and the lengthy procedures in obtaining credit from credible financial institutions.
Pressed by emergence needs, Kenyans are trooping into these shylock dens with households goods to get sorted out immediately. However extreme conditioned with which these clients are subjected to wipes out any sensible advantage that could accrue.
John painfully recalls the loss of his music system. It was a cold morning in the mid month; a shrill ring of his phone alerted him of someone who would wish to pass a message. He reached out hoping it was a call from the many corporations he had submitted his resumes.
It was never to be, on the other end, it was an all together familiar voice and an all together unwanted message; his son had been taken ill. He remembered with nostalgia that he had gone on an empty stomach. The bill was five thousand. A stone throw away, was the stall that served as both a piracy hub and a shylock shop. He had vowed never to set foot in the stall, but here, a compelling situation had called.
He woke up and looked at the Sony Home theater system he valued exceedingly, he had held onto it for quite sometime, but he would let it go. He had to.
He washed his face and bundled it into a box. He reached the stall and gave his somber story. The negotiations were not lengthy, they are never. The system missed two speakers and that reduced the value to half. And such he could only get half, the half value repayable within a fortnight. Failure would mean forfeiture of ownership.
There was a white form expressly disclaiming any intention for legal relationship except to the extent that the terms of the contract allowed. John* was handed the thrifty six thousand seven hundred shillings. He hastily entered into a money agent conveniently located near the stall and sends the money to the wife.
A week was over when he realized that he was staring a loss in the eye. He glimpsed at the contract that imprisoned him to the time frame. As the fortnight elapsed, he went to the stall just to see his system lined up for auction.
He lost his system. This is the fate that continues to glare thousands of Kenyans in the face. Another resonation would be the shilling-for-shilling madness that has deeply entrenched itself in the sugarcane growing areas of the western Kenya.
Someone would get into a debt of KSH 50,000 just to refund an exorbitant KSH 100,000 from a payment of possibly KSH 120,000. Essentially, this would mean that such a farmer is expected to live on the KSH 20,000 for the next 18 months.
This directly directs the farmer into another hole they would wish to evade.
Are these ventures operating within the licensed limits as would be other business ventures or are they illegal dens? In case they are licensed, who monitors their interest rates to protect the consumers? If they are illegal, why would the government stay and watch the citizenry become enslaved? Is this not an undermining of the mainstream financial sector?

THE GREAT BURDEN

THE IDP PUZZLE, A TRUE REFLECTION OF A SHREDDED NATION!!!

IDPS IN CAMPS

The country sighed with half relief as the Afraha High school bus led convoy snaked its way through Nakuru headed to Entebbe Kitale. As the optimistic news was aired, I reluctantly gave my cousin my reservations about a possibility of a backfire.
I never had any intelligence reports, but in my student days in Trans Nzoia, there were undertones on the Entebbe land. As such, the Saboti Land Defense Forces used to terrorize people within that region. The Kenyan military heavy handedly dealt with the SLDF and there is a sincere calm within the region. My reservations were in two folds. This is a region riddled with squatter problem and there are clear negligent acts by the government.

JAMES Orengo, the minister’s commitment to identify suitable land is questionable

Trans Nzoia is a home for several squatters; this does not excuse a rejection by the locals of colleague Kenyans who the government would wish to settle in a legitimately bought land.
However, the resettlement exercise is raising more questions than answers. Is the government absconding its duty of providing the basics to the citizens or is the resettlement another decoy to both condone impunity and enrich the leadership?
The Internally displaced persons at one point owned legitimate land even if such ownership has historical pitfalls. The biggest question is what happened to this land?
Since the Kenyan government has not provided any convincing response, speculation is within my constitutional right to opinion.
The Government concedes that the settlement was an illegality: A decision to do nothing would mean the government concedes that these people were illegal settlers and the violence meted out on them was a trespass right of expulsion being exercised by rightful owners. As a matter of fact, this could explain why taxpayers’ money was used in treating the Ocampo six to luxurious Hotels in Hague. Among the rights of the accused, article 50 (2) h provides for an accused being given an advocate at the state’s expense incase substantial injustice would occur. In light of the High Courts ruling in the matter of Daniel Muchiri Njoroge V Republic eklr (2011), well, the ICC accused qualified for an advocate. However, no where would this justify a Kenyan ambassador welcoming court bound suspects in the airport and classy cars whisking them away in a dignified manner. The state would well be saying, the 2007/2008 occurrences were a justified redress measure. But even then, the locals who expelled the IDPS would themselves be candidates of an internal strife. At least I am thinking on how they would share the spoils among themselves.
These people owned land legitimately, if the government believes there are historical injustices that should redressed, and indeed there are, these lands should be profiled and possibly handed to The National Land Commission for redress action.
However, the most pressing issue is achieving fundamental cohesion in the country so that all citizens can be accepted anywhere. This is an exigency that has obviously escaped the indolent eye of the leadership.
The political bigotry that gives a false sense of unity among antagonistic tribes is being quashed with the immediacy it deserves. The truth is that Kalenjin Kikuyu unity can never be achieved by political pronouncements on JKIA lounge. The basic causes must be addressed and this is the truth. Unless this is done, we are a false society that would wish to thrive on superficial assumptions.
The resettlement process could equally turn out as another triton or Goldenberg. Multiple purchases would definitely broaden chances of graft and unaccountability. What would happen to this land where these Kenyan are being painfully rejected?
Is this exercise digging even deeper fissures in our social fabric? How does it feel to be rejected by a society, are these IDPS outcasts or is it a creation of the status quo to ensure perpetual instability for political gains? Why wouldn’t the government establish uncontroversial spots for resettlement? A government that has a deep network of intelligence machinery could not establish the likely reaction of locals?

Raila- A chance to create a lasting legacy

Well, they have always benefited from partisan support and the best way to get such support would be to create emotions in sections of the society. They are managing well, a section of Kenya feels alienated, someone will benefit from this emotions. Hope, we don’t bring our country to the 2007 like unprecedented retreat.
Some matters need more than a sit fencing presidency and a politically conscious premiership. The unity of the country for posterity is at stake and the President in Kibaki needs to come out decisively even once for the sake of Kenya. Raila needs to emancipate himself from the chains of presidential ambitions and stand out for the country.
In this matter, I would urge peripheral participation of the two political adolescents in Ruto and Uhuru for theirs would be concerns of convenience; majorly to create an appeal and safeguard their empires.
Kibaki will be surely leaving the presidency and Raila may genuinely not vie for the presidency, can they seize the moment and unite the country. It would definitely be a plus to their legacies.

President Kibaki- His fence sitting nature is not helping matters

EDUCATE THE DISADVANTAGED

It is a sunny mid-morning; I have been travelling the whole night from Kenya’s capital to the hilly periphery of Mt. Elgon. Residents here look at strangers with discreet unease. Ravaged by the murderous SLDF spree and the military terror, the discomfort is warranted and justified.
It has been a bumpy ride bumpy in more ways than one. From the pot hole ridden Kitale Bungoma road, I take a motor cycle through a dusty stretch to Kapsitwet high school. My hosts are anxious; the principal a hefty man in all words welcomes me warmly. Written on the gate is the school’s vision: TO HELP STUDENTS ACHIEVE A MEAN GRADE OF C+ AND ABOVE.
This is the cut mark for university entry in the republic of Kenya. However, for someone to qualify for government sponsorship, the threshold is a whooping 69 point B plain. C+ would only make sense if you are talking about an affluent family that could afford the high cost University private sponsorship.
As I enter the packed hall, students clap with anticipatory reverence. I am here to give a motivational talk you would say. I start the address with a joke about the now hot finger of God saga hitting the roofs of the media. I painfully realize that no one is laughing. Wondering, I get a glimpse of a menacing ridge of Mt. Elgon. The ridge is sad and determined. Determined to seclude the people within its reign from the rest of the country. And probably, the fact that what sensationalizes the capital is a remote mystery here, only shows how successful the seclusion is.
The school would be called that as a basic skeleton. It lacks the basics and having recruited the crème de la crème of this region, spells a perpetual doom for this ridge. Emancipation from these ridges can travel tricky but it is possible.
Seated amongst my audience, is a young man whose face beams with hope. He listened to me yesteryear and when results were announced, he texted me an emotional, ‘THANK YOU SIR, YOUR WORDS SHAPED MY LIFE.”
Such are the words that tie me to this course, a course to decent ridges and dispense hope. As I emphasize the possibility of excelling from such tough circumstances, recounting with relish my turbulent times, I feel a profound connection with the audience. They believe in my words, and possibly this is the only time they have come to know that no career is a preserve of the top league schools.
I start rummaging through there questions and one question stands out: Can I change the course of my performance today? Remember we are only two months shy from the exams. I look at him with concern, sincerity is written on his face. He has never understood the opportunities the education held, he has never understood that success is a possibility, never understood that there was life beyond the village normalcy.
This story reflects the painful reality in the country. The country has secluded areas which as such are condemned to poverty. Equitable measures so far undertaken through establishment of centers of excellence in every constituency will not work effectively to redress this inequality that is an emergency.
It is a valid long term strategy but short term immediate impact strategies have to be incorporated. Central to this should be a sharp movement towards fighting cynicism in underprivileged schools and re-invigoration of the management.
I would wish to take a radical view of the miniature emphasis placed on educational empowerment in this country. The control of all social provisions has been politicized in many ways than one. As such, they either serve as vote baits, punishment for non support or deliberate suppression to ensure allegiance.
In western Kenya for instance, an area known to produce highly sharp minds, the leadership could be deliberately slowing or undermining educational empowerment to avoid probable competition and sustain dynastic tendencies. The leadership would wish to excuse their no performance by riding on ignorance.
Some regions in this country, though devoid of material resources, it could be turned into knowledge based economy. Nambale constituency in whose jurisdiction is the Busia border point would suffice as an instance. Its leadership however, is deliberately scared of empowering education so as to shield critic on non performance.
The devolutionary system envisaged in the constitution would hand this responsibility to county governments, however, education must remain a national priority to guard against regional idiosyncrasies where the empowered could wish to stifle the uninformed.
As such, there should be a clear dissociation from political influence. Education holds the key to emancipating this country from the perpetual den of underperformance. It is an avenue of reducing dependency and stimulating production. Comprehensible empowerment would provide an avenue of creating a pool of talents and objective solutions.
The country should move to seek the lost minds in ridges and villages. Brilliant minds that could provide solutions. As a matter of fact, the greatest detractor of progress in this country is cynicism. If a government outlines its development strategy like the Vision 2030, the single most danger it should look out for is a cynical and disillusioned populace.
The bulk of such a populace is a village boy who never made it through the high school successfully, the unemployed Mathare dwellers and the squatters on the periphery of the Aberdare.
As I make these suggestions, it would take a really brave government to address these issues. May be we need these heroes and heroins in government.

KYAMBI KAVALI SHE FIGHTS FOR UNDERPRIVILEGED BRIGHT CHILDREN.

DR. JAMES MWANGI- A STERLING GIVER OF WINGS

KIZITO WANGALWA- AN ADVOCATE FOR RURAL EMPOWERMENT.

EDUCATE THE DISADVANTAGED

It is a sunny mid-morning; I have been travelling the whole night from Kenya’s capital to the hilly periphery of Mt. Elgon. Residents here look at strangers with discreet unease. Ravaged by the murderous SLDF spree and the military terror, the discomfort is warranted and justified.
It has been a bumpy ride bumpy in more ways than one. From the pot hole ridden Kitale Bungoma road, I take a motor cycle through a dusty stretch to Kapsitwet high school. My hosts are anxious; the principal a hefty man in all words welcomes me warmly. Written on the gate is the school’s vision: TO HELP STUDENTS ACHIEVE A MEAN GRADE OF C+ AND ABOVE.
This is the cut mark for university entry in the republic of Kenya. However, for someone to qualify for government sponsorship, the threshold is a whooping 69 point B plain. C+ would only make sense if you are talking about an affluent family that could afford the high cost University private sponsorship.
As I enter the packed hall, students clap with anticipatory reverence. I am here to give a motivational talk you would say. I start the address with a joke about the now hot finger of God saga hitting the roofs of the media. I painfully realize that no one is laughing. Wondering, I get a glimpse of a menacing ridge of Mt. Elgon. The ridge is sad and determined. Determined to seclude the people within its reign from the rest of the country. And probably, the fact that what sensationalizes the capital is a remote mystery here, only shows how successful the seclusion is.
The school would be called that as a basic skeleton. It lacks the basics and having recruited the crème de la crème of this region, spells a perpetual doom for this ridge. Emancipation from these ridges can travel tricky but it is possible.
Seated amongst my audience, is a young man whose face beams with hope. He listened to me yesteryear and when results were announced, he texted me an emotional, ‘THANK YOU SIR, YOUR WORDS SHAPED MY LIFE.”
Such are the words that tie me to this course, a course to decent ridges and dispense hope. As I emphasize the possibility of excelling from such tough circumstances, recounting with relish my turbulent times, I feel a profound connection with the audience. They believe in my words, and possibly this is the only time they have come to know that no career is a preserve of the top league schools.
I start rummaging through there questions and one question stands out: Can I change the course of my performance today? Remember we are only two months shy from the exams. I look at him with concern, sincerity is written on his face. He has never understood the opportunities the education held, he has never understood that success is a possibility, never understood that there was life beyond the village normalcy.
This story reflects the painful reality in the country. The country has secluded areas which as such are condemned to poverty. Equitable measures so far undertaken through establishment of centers of excellence in every constituency will not work effectively to redress this inequality that is an emergency.
It is a valid long term strategy but short term immediate impact strategies have to be incorporated. Central to this should be a sharp movement towards fighting cynicism in underprivileged schools and re-invigoration of the management.
I would wish to take a radical view of the miniature emphasis placed on educational empowerment in this country. The control of all social provisions has been politicized in many ways than one. As such, they either serve as vote baits, punishment for non support or deliberate suppression to ensure allegiance.
In western Kenya for instance, an area known to produce highly sharp minds, the leadership could be deliberately slowing or undermining educational empowerment to avoid probable competition and sustain dynastic tendencies. The leadership would wish to excuse their no performance by riding on ignorance.
Some regions in this country, though devoid of material resources, it could be turned into knowledge based economy. Nambale constituency in whose jurisdiction is the Busia border point would suffice as an instance. Its leadership however, is deliberately scared of empowering education so as to shield critic on non performance.
The devolutionary system envisaged in the constitution would hand this responsibility to county governments, however, education must remain a national priority to guard against regional idiosyncrasies where the empowered could wish to stifle the uninformed.
As such, there should be a clear dissociation from political influence. Education holds the key to emancipating this country from the perpetual den of underperformance. It is an avenue of reducing dependency and stimulating production. Comprehensible empowerment would provide an avenue of creating a pool of talents and objective solutions.
The country should move to seek the lost minds in ridges and villages. Brilliant minds that could provide solutions. As a matter of fact, the greatest detractor of progress in this country is cynicism. If a government outlines its development strategy like the Vision 2030, the single most danger it should look out for is a cynical and disillusioned populace.
The bulk of such a populace is a village boy who never made it through the high school successfully, the unemployed Mathare dwellers and the squatters on the periphery of the Aberdare.
As I make these suggestions, it would take a really brave government to address these issues. May be we need these heroes and heroins in government.

KYAMBI KAVALI SHE FIGHTS FOR UNDERPRIVILEGED BRIGHT CHILDREN.

DR. JAMES MWANGI- A STERLING GIVER OF WINGS

KIZITO WANGALWA- AN ADVOCATE FOR RURAL EMPOWERMENT.

IEA GETS PRAISE

Your number one motivational company received praises for the critical part it played in preparing KCSE candidates in several schools. The deputy Principal of Geta Secondary school in Trans Nzoia which the MD visited its candidates called to give profound thanks for the company’s participation in the preparation of candidates.
Geta for the first time entered top 100 schools in National ranking an enormous skip in ranking. It outstgaed its former and more experienced rivals. The Deputy Head recalled that after the visit, candidates showed extreme change in approach to academics and because of that they posted marks that no one expected.
Geta stuggles with under-staffing  and remoteness but on his vist to the institution, the MD Lone Felix was optimistic that the school could post excellent results a belief that turned out true.
Other schools we visited and which posted Good results include: Kapkateny in Mt. Elgon, Goseta Boys (5 A-) among others.
The MD and staff of IEA congratulates all the candidates.

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY AND CHALLENGING OURSELVES

The world as it stands is experiencing rapid transformations in a host of scopes. The bar of expectations both from the society and ourselves has thus by default been raised to higher thresholds. The dynamism of our time is further fueled by globalization. Kenya has incorporated itself into the universe and effectively raised the bar of academic competition, professional proficiency and personal output to global scales.
When a student sits in a class for a CRE lesson in Kapsitwet Secondary School at the periphery of The Great Rift Valley, they are competing with a student of Religion in Sydney Australia. When a student sits for a law lecture in Kenyatta University Parklands Campus, they are competing with students in Harvard School of Law in its prominence.
To have any minimal impact on such a wide stage, one definitely needs a niche; an exemplary doctrine unique to them. This uniqueness usually is a resultant of individual responsibility and an outcome of sufficiently challenging ourselves.
As the Kenyan society collectively struggles to realize its peak goal in the next two decades, extensive emphasis should be accorded to the role of each person’s individual responsibility. Unless singularly we resolve to progress, achieving coalesced development for the entire society would prove elusive.
This is since; societal development is just but an expression of individual efforts within the society. What is expressly clear is that our society is not content. We face multiple inadequacies together. Kenya is grappling with food deficiency, problems in governance, insufficiency in social amenity provisions and diseases. We are not content ourselves with our immediate circumstances.
To paraphrase an idea fronted by James Allen: We should be stimulated in the discovery and perception of the truth that: we ourselves are makers of ourselves; by virtue of the thoughts, which we choose and encourage, that mind is the master weaver of, both of the inner garment of character and the outer garment of the circumstance.
The idealness we individually crave for can only be achieved if we sufficiently challenge ourselves into action. Indeed, the difference between success and real failure is the ability to try. No one has ever failed if they have ever tried.
Action is a matter of attitude and willingness than it is a matter of means and affluence. Everyone has abilities proportionate to their dreams. We only need a right mindset as the central impetus to propel us to the realms of our desires. We should develop an attitude that sees possibility and adores success. This would help us to overcome the immense obstacles and defy the shadows that blur our desired ends. We should learn to challenge ourselves beyond the derailing fears, attempt to act beyond suggestions and remain persistently focused on what we value. It is the surest avenue to the destination we like. Remember, our collective destiny is shaped by our individual choices.